monday mood / apr. 27th

modeandthelikemm427

Watching…
The Last Man on Earth

Reading…
The Canterbury Tales
 by Geoffrey Chaucer

Check out…
“No Man is an Island” by John Donne“Because I could not stop for Death” by Emily Dickinson / “America” by Allen Ginsberg / “Supermarket in California” by Allen Ginsberg“In Time of Plague” by Thom Gunn / “Mayakovsky” by Frank O’Hara“Lady Lazarus” by Sylvia Plath / “Tears, Idle Tears” by Alfred, Lord Tennyson“Poem in October” by Dylan Thomas / “O Me! O Life!” by Walt Whitman / “Love Calls Us to the Things of this World” by Richard Wilbur

&

Well, April is National Poetry Month, and this month I forgot over and over again to post about it. Not much to say about this, except for the fact that I am grateful that such a thing as a month honoring poetry exists. Above, see some of my favorite poems of all time.

uptown downtown

monday mood / apr. 20

modeandthelikemm420

Watching…
Daredevil

Reading…
Straight Razor: Poems by Randall Mann

Check out…
this inspiring campaign to put a woman on the $20 bill (go vote now!) / this 1944 article documenting the New York Times’s discovery of pizza / this genius NYPL compilation of all the books read by Mad Men characters / this delicious-looking radish and herb salad recipe / this account of a young American girl who joined ISIS / this essay on The Rumpus about movies and TV shows that employ violence against women / how the little-known Sonia Delaunay influenced fashion and fabric design

&

The weekend before last, at various AWP panel discussions I heard repeated over and over the sentiment “to be a good literary citizen.” I think the definition is a little different for everyone, but the phrase instantly resonated with me. Over the last two years, as I’ve become serious about the craft of writing, I’ve done everything I can to stay up to date with contemporary writers while also reading the classics. I am a patron of bookstores both big and small, new and used, and buy literary magazines, paperbacks, and hardcovers (when I can). I try to read a wide variety of online publications and take in as many viewpoints as possible. Interacting with my own literary community is the next step, as well as finding confidence in my own voice and work.

Good writing forms bonds, ignites ideas, and—in the end—connects people in ways you would’ve never imagined. I want to be a good literary citizen. It’s more than reading and writing and sending your work out into the unknown with hopes that someone will tweet it a million times; it’s about participating in a discussion, sharing in a discourse that encompasses as many people as possible. (Also, note the Michelle Blade painting of Sartre… she’s one of my favorite contemporary artists).